From clips to clicks: How to be thankful and what for

Editor’s Note: Students in Kelley Crawford’s Alternative Journalism class at Tulane University dove into the archives of the Times-Picayune to find some shinning star articles. Everything from people having snakes in their bellies to a man becoming a human torch will be covered in the series, “From Clips to Clicks.” Each weekly post will display the original piece from the Times-Picayune (the “clips”), and then the written text will either be a modern adaptation or a commentary on the piece that’s published on ViaNolaVie (the “clicks”). Here are writer of the past states what to be thankful for, and during this time, we thought we would do the same. 

A Times-Picayune article from the 1940s that details what to be thankful for and how to express that. (Photo courtesy of Tulane Archives)

What I’m thankful for during the pandemic

Conversations about life

Pets that love that I’m home

Laughter that wouldn’t have been had

The redefining and reclaiming of family

To see parents laughing with their children

For the signs being made and candles being lit for those that are at the front line of this

For technology (we curse it a lot, but never again!)

Taking time to walk and be around nature

The fact that I actually WANT to hug someone

Hearing from friends I haven’t heard from in years

The sound of a Marco Polo notification

Knowing that we can help and be helped by our communities and seeing people help and being helped by their communities

Poetry…read out loud at night

All of you

 

 

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