Buku in the age of COVID-19

UPDATE: BUKU has been cancelled. Here is their statement: 

Buku cancellation/postponement letter for 2020.

 

 

BUKU Music + Arts Project, which will be taking place in March 2020. (Photo by: Steven Hatley)

The show must and will go on, at least for now. BUKU 2020 organizers released the following statement in response to the COVID-19 situation,

“We are monitoring the situation carefully in cooperation with city and state officials. Our plan remains the same as always: which is to ensure that everyone has a great, safe weekend at BUKU this year.”

In some ways, to me at least, the COVID-19 monitoring is like being at home watching the radar as a storm churns off the coast of Florida and the spaghetti models have the storm going seventy different ways. When it becomes a hurricane officially, our ears perk up a bit more.

There are so many dynamics involved in putting on an event like BUKU. Its magnitude means that one false move could lead to a catastrophe that’s not easily bounced back from. That being said, the BUKU Music + Arts Project will be hosting their ninth even at Mardi Gras World, March 20 and 21. This year’s lineup features major artists including Tyler, The Creator*, Flume*, Illenium*, Glass Animals*, Run The Jewels, Alison Wonderland*, Zeds Dead*, Kaytranada, Megan Thee Stallion, Charli XCX*, Roddy Rich, Flatbush Zombies, Taking Back Sunday*, Pussy Riot* and many more.BUKU will also showcase local artists Bouffant Bouffant; Treety; Mhadi G; Malik Ninety Five; Raise the Death Toll; Lady Lavender B2B Edgar Allan Po’ Boy; DJ Heelturn; and the Upbeat Academy student-artists, in an effort to further their love and appreciation of the New Orleans music and arts culture.

I personally am looking forward to these (*) acts and as always am sure to find a gem or two along the way. Tickets information can be found here.

Comments

You must login to post a comment. Need a ViaNolaVie account? Click here to signup.
Recent Posts on ViaNolaVie
Footprints: An interactive public art map Kelley Crawford, Steven Melendez, and Emma Fick worked together to create a custom interactive public art map for New Orleans. This project was made possible through a grant provided by EPNO (Emerging Philanthropists of New Orleans)! Take a walk and click away! NolaVie
The truth in the lie The series, “Language and Culture in New Orleans,” (curated by Lucien Mensah) does what publications should always be doing -- it forefronts languages and culture that (check of "If Black Language Isn't a Language, Then Tell me, What Is" by James Baldwin) are true languages and culture that due to colonialism have been pushed down into the "alternative." For this article, Elizabeth Vidrine heads to her first Vodou ceremony where she learns the history and the future of Vodou in New Orleans. Krewe Accent on neighborhoods The series, “Language and Culture in New Orleans,” (curated by Lucien Mensah) does what publications should always be doing -- it forefronts languages that (check of "If Black Language Isn't a Language, Then Tell me, What Is" by James Baldwin) are true languages that due to colonialism have been pushed down into the "alternative." AAVE, or African American Vernacular English, is a dialect of American English molded by Black people’s experiences during slavery, as various communities of Africans were forced to the Americas.This article discusses the variety of dialects within New Orleans and how one’s dialect could point to a specific location in New Orleans. Different dialects may pull people apart, but the cultural identity of New Orleans allows people to be brought together. NolaVie