Photos: Mardi Gras in the Marigny 2018

Editor’s Note: To get us in the mood for Mardi Gras (who are we kidding, we’re all in the mood for Mardi Gras already), we are diving into the sugary, sensual, and silly side that makes this the most wonderful time of the year! Move over, Christmas! This entire week we will be celebrating the food, the culture, the music, and the traditions of Mardi Gras for our “Carnival Craving” series. 

Mardi Gras day saw countless krewes converge in the Marigny.  While on paper it’s known as the St. Anne Parade, in truth it’s a hodgepodge of groups, friends, and onlookers all stumbling towards the Quarter.  The costumes never fail to impress, and 2018 was no different. Here are Brandon Robert’s photos from 2018! #TBT

 

Brandon Robert is a New Orleans native who focuses his camera on the art, culture, and personalities that make this city the best city in the world. You can check out more of Brandon’s work on his website, and look for him on ViaNolaVie throughout the year.

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